Posts Tagged ‘homosexuality’

i’m digging: twenties

twenties

twenties

Ok so I know it’s only the pilot but I am in love with Twenties.  Lena Waithe, of Dear White People fame, created Twenties because she felt it was a universal story and because she needed to tell it.   While networks love the script and premise of the show; they don’t think there is an audience for Twenties.  Now we have to prove them wrong.  Lena’s call to action is simple, share Twenties with twenty of your friends.  I have already raved about this show on my facebook and my twitter but this feels like a better way to do it.  I mean, we can’t let Tyler Perry be the only voice of Black people, and especially Black women. Ugh, can we really handle more The Haves and The Haves Nots? shudders.

Although many people have been calling Twenties a “Black Girls”, I think it’s more than that.  Sure they are twenty somethings struggling in a city, but Hattie is no Hannah and that’s a good thing.  Some of my friends have said the characters are annoying, but to me that makes them endearing.  The tampon vs. pads scene was something I have seen played out many times in real life.  I wasn’t in love with the down low angle but I do know that’s a fear many women have while dating.  I love all these familiar situations finally being shown on a screen.  These aren’t your typical Black girl characters.  But what I loved most about Twenties was the way the show dealt with Hattie’s sexuality.  She’s not the gay friend, she’s the friend who having problems with her ex, who happens to be a girl.   It’s not a big deal.  But it was hit home in Hattie’s breakdown that she was in love with an emotionally damaged straight girl. (Nope, that couldn’t have been a vlog from one of my own exes.)

So check it out and let me know what you think.

 

Thank you Lena, I really hope someone picks up this series soon because I need much, much more twenties in my life.

e.

it’s a wild world

I made a new friend last week and she suggested I watch Skins (British, not MTV) because it was addictive and she was now obsessed with it.  I can understand show addiction (south park anyone?) but I kept forgetting to watch it.  She reminded me again on Thursday and I’ve been watching it on netflix ever since.  She was not kidding, I’ve been up til 3 am for the past two days watching it.  I made it through two seasons already but I wanted to talk about one scene that really struck me.  It was in the season one finale, and it’s involves Maxxie (the only openly gay kid in the grew), Anwar (the Packistani muslim) and his father.  I guess this may be a spoiler but the show aired in 2007, so meh.

Anyway, Maxxie and Anwar got into a huge fight because Anwar suddenly decided he couldn’t be cool with Maxxie being gay based on religious reasons and Maxxie wasn’t going to have that from an alchol-drinking, drug-taking, premarital-sexing-having hypocrite.  On Anwar’s birthday, Maxxie calls to wish him a happy birthday.  Anwar invites him to the party but Maxxie won’t come unless Anwar is honest with his parents and tells them that he is gay.  Understandable, Anwar is hesitant.

Throughout the episode Anwar’s dad asks him Maxxie, where is he and how much he likes him. Anwar can’t spit it out.  Later Maxxie stands outside the party but won’t go in.  Anwars looks for him but doesn’t see him.  Later Anwar calls Maxxie to share some good news and finds him outside.  Maxxie still won’t come inside.  Just then the dad comes out and talks to Maxxie, and this is when Anwar finally gets the balls to tell his dad Maxxie is gay.  His talks talks right over this, so Maxxie tells him himself.  His dad pauses, smiles and then says:

It’s a fucking, stupid, messed up world.  I’ve got my God, he speaks to me every day.  Some things I just can’t work out, so I leave them be.  OK?  Even if I think they are wrong because I know one day he’ll make me understand.  I’ve got that trust.  It’s called belief.  I’m a lucky man.

Now I know, I know, it’s just TV.  But I’ve just got to hope that some time soon more people can take this attitude.  You don’t have to like it, but let it be.  And maybe if you’re mature enough, you can try to understand it.  When I think of David Katu and other gay people in Uganda and other African countries, people having to prove their gayness to stay in America, hell, adults making fun of the princess boy, I get so sad.  All this hatred and violence, based on religious ideals, because people can’t put enough faith in their God and  that he has a plan that it’ll all make sense some day.  It’s wild, wild world dude.

peace,
e.

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I can’t stop watching documentaries about DL men

I guess lucky for me, I can only find two. The most recent documentary I’ve seen is called “On the Downlow.”  this one is actually a documentary. I can understand why a man in the download would want to come out in a documentary but I’m thankful that I can watch it. The strange thing about the down low is that I think I been misinformed about what it was. The lady it was first rate on Oprah I thought that all down low men identified as street, but in this documentary they were all just in the closet.  I thought that all DL men considered themselves straight, but in the documentary most of them identified at least as bisexual. Another interesting fact was that they were all pretty feminine. So when they finally decided to come out to some friends it was not a surprise to any of them. So now I am a little more confused than I was before.

The way my friends talk about it it seems like you need to be afraid of all black men. But in the documentary all the men that were on the downloads were pretty feminine, and although that is stereotypical to assume that feminine man are all gay was true for the men in this film.  Don’t get me wrong I’m not advocating that all feminine men are gay or bisexual, but it was a relief to know that all the DL men aren’t parading around as super street hard-core manly men, and that it might be easier to spot a DL than originally was thougt.

I need to formulate my thoughts on this one some more.

e.

Eva vs. homophobia: Part 1

Entitled part 1 because I’m sure there will be many more of these.

And here we go again.  I feel like I’m constantly arguing with my peers about homophobia.  It always surprises me how educated people can be so freaking ignorant.  For the past week I had been arguing about bisexuality.  Among the gems thrown my way were: “There’s no such thing as bisexuality, once you have intercourse with someone of the same sex once you’re forever gay.” and “Bisexuality (and not homosexuality) is what is wrong in America.”  And I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the Bible pushers.  I honestly just don’t think Jesus would love everyone but homosexual, I just don’t.  I don’t think God hates gay.  I don’t think homosexuality is a choice, and even if it was, I don’t think people should be controlling what others do in their bedroom.  I think gay marraige should be legalized and I think it will be within the next decade.

I think Black people especially need to get over their homophobia.  I believe men on the DL is such a problem because of homophobia.  I think if Black gay men could be out and accepted (at least in rates similar to the White community), I think there would be a lot less DL and more out (and happy) men.  In terms of bisexual men, there is little to no incentive to be honest.  I’ve met numerous women who flat out refuse to date a bisexual man, even if he was perfect in every way.  It blows my mind.  With all these women crying about being single and the lack of eligible men, how can we completely shut off a whole group of men.

</rant>

peace,
e.