March 2009 archive

The DL Chronicles

So I finally got around to watching The DL Chronicles and boy was it more than I expected.  The first season of the Here! TV show features the stories of 4 different men living on the down low.  It is written, produced and directed by Quincy LeNear and Deondray Gossett, it appears as if at least one was on the DL at some point in time.  Although I would argue that two episodes feature gay men who are in the closet as opposed to men on the DL, it is an interesting perspetive on men on the DL.

By far the most horrifying episode is that of  Boo.  Boo is the DL man that we are taught to be afraid of.  He is attractiv,  he is promiscious and he is HIV+. Yikes.  In the episode he lives with his girlfriend until she kicks him out, this seems to be a regular occurance.  When she kicks him out, he goes and lives with his God fearing mother.  He hangs with his boys on the stoop and makes fun of the flamboyant Jesse.  Boo’s mother knows her son is promiscious and accepts that, as his father was the same way.  She is just grateful that he’s not an embarrassment to her like Jesse is to his mother.  The uneasiness in his face explains part of the reason why he never talks to his friends about his sexuality.  In fact, the only people he seems to discuss this with are the other men he sleeps with.  At one point Boo explains “I’m not gay!” to which a naked man simply laughs.   It’s painful and frustrating.

There’s a really telling scene (clip 2) where Boo is smoking with Jesse and Boo says “I don’t know how you do it dude.”  Jesse simply replies, “Honey, it ain’t easy being me.  But it beats being somebody else.”  Understatement of the year.

Of course, you know how it ends.  A man Boo has slept with repeatedly (without a condom) ends up in the hospital and is diagnosed with HIV.  Boo refuses to believe this but eventually accepts it.  It’s assumed he is positive, but we never see Boo get tested, nor do we see him tell any of his many sexual partners that they should get tested as well.

The purpose of the show is not to scare women even more than they already are.  I think the writers are trying to create some empathy for the DL but to also be realistic with what is going on.  I definitely recommend checking it out.

peace,
e.

back to school for me

I just realized I never blogged about that fact that I’m headed back to school in the fall.  Right back to Columbia to get my PhD is social policy and policy analysis.   I thought I had a dissertation idea (well I do) but when I went to the open house and began talking with my homeboy who is already a candidate there, he gave a super amazing idea – or at least the beginnings of an idea – for what I think is an even better idea.  When I flush it out more I’ll share.

Ok that’s it.  I don’t know why I am up this early.  Back to bed for me.

peace,
e.

Eva vs. homophobia: Part 1

Entitled part 1 because I’m sure there will be many more of these.

And here we go again.  I feel like I’m constantly arguing with my peers about homophobia.  It always surprises me how educated people can be so freaking ignorant.  For the past week I had been arguing about bisexuality.  Among the gems thrown my way were: “There’s no such thing as bisexuality, once you have intercourse with someone of the same sex once you’re forever gay.” and “Bisexuality (and not homosexuality) is what is wrong in America.”  And I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the Bible pushers.  I honestly just don’t think Jesus would love everyone but homosexual, I just don’t.  I don’t think God hates gay.  I don’t think homosexuality is a choice, and even if it was, I don’t think people should be controlling what others do in their bedroom.  I think gay marraige should be legalized and I think it will be within the next decade.

I think Black people especially need to get over their homophobia.  I believe men on the DL is such a problem because of homophobia.  I think if Black gay men could be out and accepted (at least in rates similar to the White community), I think there would be a lot less DL and more out (and happy) men.  In terms of bisexual men, there is little to no incentive to be honest.  I’ve met numerous women who flat out refuse to date a bisexual man, even if he was perfect in every way.  It blows my mind.  With all these women crying about being single and the lack of eligible men, how can we completely shut off a whole group of men.

</rant>

peace,
e.

why i love noah’s arc

Sorry I’ve been m.i.a., I’ve been finishing the second draft of my first chapter and deciding which PhD program to go to.

Anywhoo, during the madness of the past month I stumbled upon a TV show called Noah’s Arc.  Noah’s Arc is a Black gay sex and the city.  I cannot stop watching this show (on netflix, it’s totally off the air).   There are many things I love about this show.  For one, it features different types of Black men.  They don’t all look the same, they don’t act the same, they don’t the same, they don’t deal with the same issues. I love the diversity.  There’s the intellectual college professor who is a little uptight, there’s the super free spirit, who is a little too free with his body, there’s the mama/diva and then there’s the niave screenwriter.  The show deals with coming out, AIDS, homophobia, issues within the gay community re: acting feminine, gay marriage, childen, and of course relationships.

Another thing I love about the show is the way it portrays fathers*spoiler alert* When Chance and Eddie break up the first time, Chance keeps his commitment to Eddie’s daugher.  He made it a point to still be in her life.  The show doesn’t spend a lot of time on it, but I thought it was so important to show a Black man being commited to a child, especially one that was not biologically his.  In season 2 and in the movie, two other couples ponder adoption. I think this is so important as the dominant view of Black men and fatherhood is that it’s something Black men are afraid of and avoid.

The show is not perfect, the acting is not the best.  But the show is hilarious and really touches upon a lot of important issues, not only for the gay audience but the straight as well.  I encourage you to watch it on netfilix or logonline.com.

peace,
e.